Maple Heights Ohio Culture

Over the last century, the house has hosted countless celebrations, gatherings and events that have helped to advance the Slovenian-American community in Maple Heights, Ohio, and the community in general. Over the years it has become the largest "Slovenian home" in the USA, attracting Slovenians from all over the world.

Slovenian-American community that moved to the Maple Heights area in the late 1800s and established itself as one of the largest communities of its kind in Ohio. At the beginning of the 20th century it had become a village incorporated, with the same boundaries that still define it today.

Most of the original residents of Talford Avenue were Czechs, Italians, Hungarians, Poles, and Jews who moved to the suburbs to pursue suburban living that had many of the same amenities as the suburbs of New York and Chicago. African Americans began to gain access to good-faith suburbs, starting with a significant proportion who moved to Lee and Harvard in 1957. American homeowners have been targeted by predatory lending and subsequent foreclosures, including by the Federal Reserve, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and other government agencies. One study found that they were burdened with subprime loans and were responsible for more than half of all mortgage defaults in the US during the 1990 "s.

Maple Heights has a median value of $69,439, and the median cost of rent is $860 a month. The majority of residents on Talford Avenue and Maple Heights Blvd are low- to middle-income people, making it one of the most affordable neighborhoods in the city.

Of the residents of Maple Heights, 15.3% have a college degree, 38.7% have a high school degree, 4.9% have a college degree and 4% have a bachelor's degree. 7.5% of the population are widows, 18.4% work part-time, 5.6% have no health insurance, 8.2% live in poverty, 6.7% have no health insurance and 18% - 5% of them have some form of disability, according to the census.

In Maple Heights, 1.5% work part-time, 4.7% live in poverty, 6.2% have no health insurance, 8.4% are widows and 2.6% are disabled in some form, according to the census.

In Maple Heights, 1.5% work part-time, 4.7% live in poverty, 6.2% have no health insurance, and 2.6% are disabled in some form, according to the census.

In Maple Heights, 1.5% work part-time, 4.7% live in poverty and 2.6% are disabled in some form, according to the census.

In Maple Heights, 1.5% work part-time, 4.7% live in poverty and 2.6% are disabled in some form, according to the census.

In Maple Heights, 1.5% work part-time, 4.7% live in poverty and 2.6% are disabled in some form, according to the census.

In Maple Heights, 1.5% work part-time, 4.7% live in poverty and 2.6% are disabled in some form, according to the census.

The 3-mile stretch runs from Abbeyville Road to Lester Road in York Township, and most of the way follows an abandoned rail corridor between Baltimore and Ohio through a largely rural landscape, some heavily forested and along which a few small towns lie.

The Olde Muskingum Trail runs parallel to the Tuscarawas River and the Ohio - Erie Canalway, and Dunham Road provided access to the canal when completed in 1827. The Cleveland and Pittsburgh railroads opened a depot in northwestern Bedford Township in 1870, followed by the completion of the Connotton Valley Railroad in 1881.

More About Maple Heights

More About Maple Heights